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English Vs American - One Girl Revolution
December 2008
 
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raine1882
raine1882
Raine1882
Mon, Mar. 24th, 2008 09:04 am
English Vs American

As you all know, I work for my dad's company.  We have drivers all over the world - in particular, though, we have 4 from the U.K.  We also have a forum board where the guys talk about their cars and offer suggestions/support.   Having Brits and 'Merkins can sometimes be amusing. 

British Driver #1: "I couldn't put a longer screw in as I was using the longest 4-40's that would fit, the 3mm fit but it feels like a bodge."
American Driver #1: "You crazy Brits -- speak English please!!!  Wot's a bodge???"
American Driver #2: "From context, I'm guessing "something terrible."
British Driver #2: "Botch? Scrapheap challenge it together."
American Driver #1: "That made no more sense than the previous..."

At which point, the following website was suggested...

Here

This is a website I could waste hours on!  It's got fantastic definitions.  For instance:

codswallop:  n, an antiquated but superb word meaning "nonsense".

having kittensexpl, extremely nervous. For some reason.

cockney:  n adj, a person from the east end of London - the true definition requires them to have been "born within the sound of the bells of Bow Church". A more modern definition might be "born within the sound of a racist beating", "born in the back of a stolen Mercedes" or perhaps "born within the range of a Glock semi-automatic". They have a distinctive accent, which other Brits are all convinced that they can mimic after a few pints.

cot:  n, crib. Americans call a sort of frame camp bed a "cot". Brits don't. I'd say they just called it a "camp bed", as God intended. I'm guessing that he intended that. The Bible is fairly ambiguous about which day God chose to create camp beds.

jam:  n, jelly. Sort of. What Americans call "jelly" (fruit preserve without fruity-bits in it), Brits still call "jam". What Americans call "jello", Brits call "jelly". Oh yes, and what Americans call "jam" is still "jam" in the UK. I think that's the jams pretty much covered.

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dracis
dracis
Dracis Tran
Mon, Mar. 24th, 2008 10:27 pm (UTC)

I'm physically restraining myself from that link until April 6th.


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